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£130,000 of medical aid to Palestine hospitals

25th November, 2014

Islamic Help and its partners have delivered medical aid worth nearly £130,000 to hospitals in Palestine.

The consignment of essential medicines and medical equipment was shipped in a 40ft container from Salt Lake City in the United States to the West Bank. It was handed over to the Palestine Red Crescent Society which has distributed it to 8 hospitals and the Orphan Association in Jericho.

The items include emergency consumables, fluids, drips, wheelchairs, crutches and other goods.  The hospitals receiving the aid included Bethlehem; Islah in Jericho; Makkased in Jersualem; the UN Hospital in Qalqilya; Samou’, Zahreya, Yatta and the Hebron Main Hospital, all in Hebron.

The programme involved Islamic Help, United Muslim Relief and Globus Relief. The distribution of the medical supplies, worth US $200,000, required the approval of the Israeli government which came just before the outbreak of the Gaza conflict.

Mohammad Shafi, public relations and projects manager for the Palestine Red Crescent Society, said: “Developing the health care sector in Palestine gives added value to providing a good life for poor people and to stop suffering which is one of the main causes of violence.”

The medical aid shipment was among a number of initiatives carried out by Islamic Help during 2014 to help the people of Palestine. In July, a meeting was held in Washington by Islamic Help and UMR with Matthew Reynolds, the Director of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), to agree an aid partnership with Muslim NGOs in the UK and USA.

During the Gaza conflict, Islamic Help delivered £100,000 of medicines to Gaza’s hospitals in just one week and also distributed more than 3,000 hygiene packs to UNRWA as well as providing emergency aid in the form of food and water, and our Gaza100 Water Challenge appeal to construct a new water plant serving nearly 10,000 people daily.

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